Zoom Arbitration – Friend or Foe?

September 19, 2020 6:00 am Published by |

Is “Remote Arbitration” an oxymoron? Or is it the wave of the future?  While most of the ADR rules allow for video presentation of evidence in an arbitration, there is little guidance on full hearings being conducted through remote procedures. In the past, parties have agreed to present one witness via videotape or videoconference where the witness was not able to travel to the venue of the hearing. However, most parties, lawyers, and neutrals have been reticent to agree to fully remote proceedings.  With the continued restrictions required by the COVID-19 pandemic, parties, lawyers, and arbitrators are all starting to look at the need to embrace remote proceedings.

However, with the status of the COVID-19 pandemic, the future of dispute resolution clearly will be dependent upon the use of remote proceedings, and the well-informed practitioner should come to the proverbial table with an approach to make the most of the remote process.

Four Key Considerations for an Effective Remote Arbitration

As more cases are presented through remote arbitration (potentially jury trials in the near future), there are several considerations that practitioners should keep in mind to ensure the most effective representation of their clients. Of course, reams have been written about communication skills and styles, but there are four key considerations for a remote arbitration proceeding to consider: (1) understanding your audience; (2) getting the evidence to your arbitrator; (3) controlling the room; and (4) managing the technology.

1. Understanding Your Audience

While it is important to know your arbitrator’s background, most counsel are not vetting the neutral’s ability to use technology or how the neutral will be able to engage in the process over video or control the process and witnesses.  This is a difficult skill to assess. However, many arbitrators have been working diligently to come up to speed on the technology and have familiarized themselves with the various platforms. 

2. Getting the Evidence to the Arbitrator

Be sure that you have worked with the arbitrator to have all of the proper procedures and rules in place to allow for an effective remote hearing as well as to ensure that you can get the necessary evidence to your arbitrator.

Getting the Witness Testimony Clearly Communicated

Many practitioners are concerned about the ability to test the credibility of witnesses in a videoconference format. However, this issue can be overcome with careful preparation of the witnesses, and having clear rules in the scheduling order addressing where and how witnesses can be presented (ensuring there is no coaching or others in the room). 

Who Has Control – Remote Exhibits

One of the most important issues that is a difference for many practitioners is the handling of exhibits in a remote proceeding.  Depending on the agreement of the parties, the exhibits can be exchanged in advance between the parties and a set provided to the arbitrator electronically for use during the hearing, or the exhibits can be uploaded onto the remote proceeding site.  If the exhibits are exchanged in advance, a set will also need to be provided to the witness in advance; it is recommended that they be placed in a sealed envelope to be opened by the witness on screen once under oath.

3. Issues Raised By Who Is “In The Room”

One other question to consider before you proceed with the arbitration hearing is how to maintain the confidentiality of the process and who will be allowed to be in the videoconference and when. Will witnesses be held in a “waiting room” and be admitted when their time slot is ready?  Will counsel have pre-set times for when witnesses will be called? Will witnesses be called out of order? These issues will require a discussion of counsel and the arbitrator to resolve these issues in advance.

4. Technology- Choose the Platform

What platform will be used is another consideration that will need to be agreed upon early on. This will allow counsel sufficient advance time to practice and be familiar with the platform. In addition, you can work with your witnesses to practice, particularly with how to work with the exhibits and how to readily find sections on the documents in response to questions posed.

Overall, conducting a remote arbitration is not the most ideal scenario, but effective lawyers can prepare their witnesses, ensure clarity and credibility of their cases and presentations by being aware of use of non-verbal communication to support their cases, and pre-planning and preparing exhibits carefully and having a plan in place for maneuvering through exhibits to ensure that the information you want the arbitrator to see, understand, and digest.  In addition, paying careful attention to the technical details and discussing how the witnesses will be presented will allow for a smoother process where the more confident counsel’s case can be effectively presented to the arbitrator.

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